Festivals in Rizal Province

Rizal province’s festivals are more likely about Religion.

Here is a list of their festivals that are interesting and worth-visiting:

Ang Hatol (The Way of the Cross) (Good Friday; Cainta, Rizal)
In Cainta, Rizal, however, people take to the streets and the community theater to act out and witness passion plays associated with the Passion of Christ.

Giwang-giwang (Binangonan, Rizal)
A play reenacting the funeral of Jesus Christ through a procession on Good Friday. People searching for an amulet or anting-anting join this religious activity.

The Subok (Tanay and Taytay, Rizal)
A group of men, after feasting and overnight meditation, gather around the church to wait for the Santo Entierro, a wooden statue of the dead Christ. The “subok,” is the testing of the talismans by using whips, revolvers, knives, and machetes (bolos) throughout the afternoon and evening till Saturday. Each one tests the effectivity of this talisman by requesting another man to shoot, whip or stab him.

Salubong Festival (Angono, Rizal)
Black Saturday is highlighted by a 3-hour presentation at the churchyard wherein high-tech stage decorations and sound system with trained production staff assist the “Vigilia ng Muling Pagkabuhay” as they are fondly called by the parish. Easter Sunday celebration is held in a place called Galilea where the reunion of the Risen Christ with the Virgin Mary is re-enacted.

Tayo na sa Antipolo Festival (Antipolo City)
A month-long celebration to honor Our Lady of Peace and Good Voyage. Devotees are seen taking the much-trodden path leading to Antipolo. The image, which is already three centuries old, is said to exhibit supernatural powers. In the evening of April 30, thousands of pilgrims from several places in Metro Manila and nearby towns begin an annual trek to the path, on foot.

Feast of San Clemente (Higantes Festival) (Angono, Rizal)
Angono’s joyful fiesta in honor of San Clemente whose image, resplendent in papal vestment, is borne by male devotees during a procession accompanied by “parehadoras” (devotees dressed in local costumes, wooden shoes, and carrying boat paddles) and “higantes,” (giant wooden figures made from papier mache and bamboo). The street event culminates in a fluvial procession on the shores of Laguna de Bay, amidst revelry that continues until the image is brought back to the parish church.

pattimallari.multiply.com

Speak Your Mind

*